Sunday, December 14, 2008

Little Shit's

NIC H'DEZ

PPPPIIIIKAAACHUUUU!!! ph Nick Borelli

Little Nic H’dez is a local grom who’s been turning heads for quite some time now. Under the tutelage of SC Legend Adam Replogle, Nic has developed a smooth and technical style which is impressive for a youngster of his age. His chubby little chipmunk cheeks and ear to ear grin just make you wanna hug the little feller, while his Curren like cutbacks prompt considering retirement. He’s like a little Pikachu doll worming through the lineup, giggling and squeaking all the while. It will be interesting to see what happens when he fills out, and I’m going to safely bet that its going to be big things!


Insight

Gulp!
INSIGHT-WINTER TIME
by Neal Kearney, As seen in Surfshot magazine. www.surfshot.com

MIKE PARSONS

NK-What does Winter mean to you?
MP-Cold water, less crowds, big waves.
NK-How do you prepare yourself for Winter?
MP-The approach to winter I start to feel excited the thought of big surf and off- shore wind cold water definitely what I live for. I also start to get nerves I know it will be real big soon and I start to think if I am ready. its the same feeling every October. As for preparation I try to really get in the water a lot just surf tell I can’t surf anymore. Try to be in great shape and mentally strong which for me comes from surfing.
NK-Heaviest Winter surf trip?
MP-Last year Cortez bank January. Myself, Brad Gerlach, Twiggy and Greg Long. Biggest waves of my life, just the four of us out. Definitely the best day of surfing in my Life. Just hoping for another day like that again.
TARIK KHASHOGGI
NK-How do you prepare for Winter?mentally?physically?
TK-Generally the surf is pretty small around Santa Barbara during the summer and getting good waves or even staying in the water can be challenging. I've found that for me the best way to stay on top of my game is to travel constantly during the summer especially south of the border to some of the big ledge beach breaks. This not only keeps me sane during flat summer months but also so that when winter rolls around it doesn't take so long to brush of those Cobb webs.
NK-Favorite Winter surf destination? why?
TK-Well I have to say that I have traveled to quite a few destinations throughout our winter months but the fact is some of the best waves I have gotten have been right here on the central coast. Although I do love spending time in Hawaii and there are few (if any) places that compare too the barrels on the North Shore, we have some insane waves right here at home that I'm usually bummed if I miss. I've actually flown home early from trips to score waves at home that rarely break, and am pretty damned stoked I did.
NK-Heavy Winter story?
TK-The heaviest thing that has ever happened to me happened 6 years ago on the North Shore. It was a pretty solid 8 to 10 foot day at sunset, I was sitting pretty deep on the bowl when this monster left came through. Going left is usually a bad idea out there considering the bone yard you end up in. The last thing I remember as the thing shut down on me was all those coral heads boiling up in front of me. I went of over the falls and took one of those pylons directly to the face. The pain was by no means unbearable but when I surfaced there was so much blood I figured I wasn't doing so good. I made my way to the beach and started to head back up to the house I was staying at. As I was walking up the beach this girl came running up to me asking if I needed to go to the hospital and that she could call an ambulance for me. I didn't think I was that bad, told her I was fine and walked up to the house. When I got back all the guys I was staying with started freaking out and when I finally looked in the mirror I immediately got really light headed and almost fainted. The wound below and above my right eye was pretty substantial. My lower eyelid had been completely torn back leaving the lower eye socket exposed. There was another large gash just above my eye about 3/4 of inch long. My friends quickly rushed me to the hospital in Wahiawa, and I remember distinctly the doctor jumping back in shock when I removed the bandage I had been holding over my eye. He ended up examining the wounds and told me he could not fix them considering all the muscle and tendon had been stripped from the bone. He explained that I would need a plastic surgeon if I ever wanted my eye to look normal again. As I left the hospital, a bit nervous to say the least, I called my mom and explained what had happened. As it turns out we had a family friend in Honolulu that was a plastic surgeon and eyelid specialist at that. LUCKY! After a four hour surgery which included forty interior stitches to put back together the muscle and tendon, twenty exterior stitches to close up the wound and then another ten to close up the cut above my eye I walked out with a massive headache. It's been six years since the incident and the job sowing up my eye was so good you can barely even notice a scar. The funny thing is though every time I'm back in Hawaii and I see some of those big left barrels coming through sunset I still get the urge to go get one. Maybe next time ill make it..
NK-favorite big wave spot?
TK-There are a bunch of big wave spots on the central coast that are unbelievable when they're on. I also have had some great sessions out at Rockpile in Hawaii.
NK-favorite big wave surfer?
TK-I love watching Flea, he's a Fucking maniac!!!
ADAM REPLOGLE
I really like the feeling of the seasons changing. The rain tells me its winter and next comes the smells of winter that bring back childhood memories. That has always got me pumped. Santa Cruz gets just enough rain to enjoy and never to much. Some of our best waves are formed by rain or the storm that usually comes w/rain. I really never feel like I am ready for winter and before you know it its here. Physically I try and surf as much as possible and cross train with tow surfing and long boarding. P.T once told me that the best training for surfing was surfing, so I try and surf as much as my life will let me. Mentally, I try and be as confident as i can be by being prepared. Do your home work, figure your guns out before you need them. Stuff like that. I freak out when the surfs good, everything come to a halt and then I call one of my surf partners Al, Mulcoy, Noi, Homer or Skindog alls these guys wake up early and will surf just about anything.
My favorite part about winter is riding waves that don't break in summer. The River Mouth, The Harbor and a few underground spots. We have this left at Pleasure Point that on the right angled swell it turns into a little pit. Winter also breaks up the crowd and who doesn't like that.
I would say that my heaviest winter surf trip would have to be to the North Shore. For around 10 years a lot of Santa Cruz boys would go to Hawaii and get pounded. Richard Schmidt showed us a few heavy surfs, I remember Peter Mel charging Waimea Bay as a 15 year old and Barney charging "TUBE CITY" which is inside Kamiland iand it’s heavy when its big.
My favorite winter time warrior would have to be Chris Brown. He is a classic.
Winter time means its a time to be challenged. A time to put your skills to the test. It means cold low pressures. It is a time when on any given swell our region could be the biggest surfable spot on earth. Winter time means you could see Garrett MacNamura at the bakery or Ross Clark Jones on the docks. Winter times means Alpha Males and P.W.Cs, Big wave events and the Cold Water Classic. Winter means "WAVES" and for a lot of people, myself included, it means surf season.
ALISTAIR CRAFT
NK-What does the the approach of winter mean to you? What kinds of feelings and emotions does this approach conjure up? How do you prepare (physically/mentally)?
AC-TO ME, THE APPROACH OF WINTER BRINGS A CERTAIN TYPE OF ANTICIPATION. AS I’VE AGED MY TIME IN THE WATER HAS STEADILY DECREASED, AND IN THE SUMMER I DON’T SURF A WHOLE LOT AS PRIORITIES HAVE SHIFTED. BUT IN THE WINTER MY MOTIVATION KICKS IN AND I DON’T WANT TO MISS A MOMENT WHEN THE CONDITIONS COME TOGETHER AT MY FAVORITE SPOTS. I HAD MY FIRST WINTER SURF THE OTHER DAY AND IT SURPRISED ME HOW STOKED I WAS. I PULLED INTO A CRAPPY CLOSE-OUT BARREL AND DIDN’T COME OUT. WHEN I SURFACED I CLAIMED IT.
MY MENTAL PREPARATION IS PRETTY SIMPLE. I’VE LEARNED TO STAY CALM WHEN ADAM YELLS AT ME. WHAT MORE PREPARATION DO I NEED?
PHYSICALLY, I RIDE MOUNTAIN BIKES IN THE SUMMER WITH MY WIFE AND A COUPLE FRIENDS. SHE’S A PERSONAL TRAINER SO OCCASIONALLY SHE’LL GET ME TO DO ONE OF HER CLASSES. I FIGURE IF I CAN KEEP HER IN MY SITE I’M DOING WELL. I’M PRETTY SURE SHE COULD KICK LAIRD’S ASS.
NK-Whats your favorite part about winter?
AC-I LOVE THE FIRST MORNING THAT YOU SENSE THE SEASON IS CHANGING. YOU WALK OUT YOUR FRONT DOOR AND YOUR TOES AND NOSE FEEL THE CHILL AND YOU KNOW WINTER IS ON ITS WAY. YOU CAN SMELL IT IN THE AIR.
NK-Heaviest Winter surf trip?
AC-IT’S EASIER FOR ME TO RECALL HEAVY MOMENTS RATHER THAN HEAVY TRIPS. THE FUNNY THING IS, WHEN I THINK ABOUT IT, SNIPS IS PART OF MOST OF THOSE MEMORIES. HE HAS A WAY OF LURING ME INTO HEAVY SESSIONS. THE FIRST TRIP I MADE WITH HIM WAS IN 90 SOMETHING WITH TAYLOR KNOX AND RB TO TODOS SANTOS. WE PULL UP AND IT’S GIANT AND BLOWN TO HELL. I ASSUME WE’RE OUT OF THERE AN NEXT THING YOU KNOW SNIPS IS PUTTING HIS WETSUIT ON. I DON’T WANT TO BE THE WUSS SO I START SUITING UP AS WELL. TAYLOR STARTS CURSING SNIPS UNDER HIS BREATH AND NEXT THING YOU KNOW WERE ALL TAKING BEATINGS. BROKEN LEASHES, BROKEN BOARDS, BROKEN ... I CAN REPEAT THIS STORY A DOZEN TIMES IN A DOZEN DIFFERENT LOCATIONS.
NK-Favorite Winter time warrior?
AC-PETER MEL HAS ALWAYS BEEN A FAVORITE, AND IF YOUR ASKING ABOUT WINTERTIME SPECIFICALLY, HE IS THE GUY. UNQUESTIONABLE TALENT IN BIG WAVES. THERE ARE PLENTY OF GUYS LIKE ME, DUMB ENOUGH TO GO ON A BIG ONE, BUT ONLY A HANDFUL OF GUYS THAT “SURF” A BIG WAVE. PETER IS THE BEST. AND MOST IMPORTANTLY PETER IS A GOOD PERSON, HUMBLE AND GENEROUS. MY FAVORITE SURFER IN ALL CONDITIONS IS ADAM REPLOGLE. ASK MOST GUYS IN SANTA CRUZ AND HE’S TOWARDS THE TOP OF THE LIST. BEST STYLE, POSITIONING… I’LL ALWAYS HAVE A PLACE IN MY HEART FOR RUFFO. WE WALK IN DIFFERENT CIRCLES BUT I’VE ALWAYS RESPECTED HIS APPROACH TO SURFING UP HERE. HE DOES’NT JUST SURF THE LANE, HE SURFS EVERY SPOT WHEN IT’S CONDITIONS ARE IDEAL. I LEARNED A LOT FROM HIM THAT WAY. AND LAST BUT NOT LEAST, HOW ABOUT DONKEY DWAYNE? NO ONE SURFS MORE THAN DWAYNE, NO MATTER HOW SHITTY IT IS.
NK-What does Winter time in Santa cruz mean?
AC-I’M PRETTY SURE WHEN I’M OLD AND DECREPID, MY KIDS ARE PUSHING ME AROUND IN MY WHEELCHAIR AND MY UNFORTUNATE WIFE IS CHAINGING MY DIAPERS, MY FONDEST MEMORIES OTHER THAN FAMILY ARE GOING TO BE THE WINTERS THAT ADAM AND I HAVE SPENT AT MOSS LANDING. WE’VE HAD SO MANY GOOD SESSIONS AND SUCH GOOD TIMES THESE PAST FEW YEARS. THEY MAY BE COMING TO AN END SOON FOR VARIOUS REASONS, BUT THE MEMORIES WILL ALWAYS BE THERE.
NK-How do you adjust your quiver for Winter time?
AC-HERE’S HOW I ADJUST MY QUIVER FOR WINTERTIME. I CALL MY SHAPER IN JULY AND ORDER SOME BOARDS. I START BUGGING HIM IN AUGUST. IN SEPTEMBER I HECKLE HIM AND CALL HIM FAT. INOCTOBER I YELL. IN NOVEMBER I TELL HIM I’M GOING TO ORDER BOARDS FROM SOMEONE ELSE. IN DECEMBER I’M A LITTLE NICER TO HIM, BEING CHRISTMAS AND ALL. HE’S VERY SENSITIVE. IN JANUARY I CALL HIM EVERY TIME I’M ON MY WAY FOR A SURF, AND WHEN I’M ON MY WAY HOME. BY FEBRUARY I FIGURE IT’S ALL OVER SO I LEAVE HIM ALONE. THE BOARDS SHOW UP IN MARCH SO I’M LUCKY IF I RIDE THEM ONCE. MAYBE THIS YEAR I’LL START THE PROCESS IN APRIL. BUT THOSE BOARDS ARE WORTH THE WAIT. THE TRUTH IS I’VE BEEN RIDING THE SAME BOARD FOR 4 YEARS AND NO OTHERS COMPARE. THANKS COLE!

SC LEGENDS

The Condor, spreading his wings. photo Patrick Tehan




PETER MEL AKA THE CONDOR, SC LEGEND


Swooping down at break neck speeds, using his gigantic wingspan to steady himself, the Condor falls from the sky. More often than not the Condor (aka Peter Mel), lands smoothly, with style and grace to boot. Pete is arguably one of the most complete surfers on earth, going full bore on anything from 2’ to 50’. Pete has deep Santa Cruz roots, with the incredible ability to make friends wherever he goes (Which helps to explain the fact he’s a South, West, and East side local). Pete helps his dad run Freeline surf shop on 41st avenue, so from time to time you might spot him behind the counter pretending to work. A go to guy for advice or a chat, Pete’s got some knowledge. Nowadays he’s been putting this knowledge and insight to work, by working as a commentator for a number of different QS’s and WCT contests, and you can always count on him to speak his mind. Pete’s a great representative of Santa Cruz and surfing in general, and its good to see him still charging and taking his licks like a young buck.

WTF?

Going for it! photo-jack english (transworldsurf.com)


Giant surf at Mavericks

A core group of hell men recently tackled some of the largest and heaviest surf ever paddled into. As thirty foot bombs detonated upon Maverick’s eerie reef, chargers such as Grant “Twiggy” Baker, Mark Healy, Greg Long, Nic Lamb, Taylor Paul, Lance Herriman, Skin Dog, Alex Martins, Nathan Fletcher and Shawn Dollar all proved their bravery by taking off deep and steep on waves usually reserved for Tow-ins. Guy’s were falling like flies, and Mavericks was all too willing to swat them down mercilessly. While the carnage was considerable, a number of all time rides and awe inspiring feats of fearlessness went down, and it will be a day this group of big wave brethren will surely remember.

Monday, November 24, 2008

Little Shit's

Kai-Lining- photo-Thomas Bischoff

Kai Medeiros has some new friends. As an avid long boarder at Pleasure Point, he’s always enjoyed the presence of testy short boarders and treacherous beginners. Now, Kai has some awesome new neighbors in the lineup.

“On a nice summer day at the Point, my surf buddies can often include what seems like 500 people. For example, this afternnon I had the pleasure of surfing with a number of disciples of the new movement known as SUP (Stand Up Paddling). They must been really friendly, because they wanted to share every set wave with me and went out of their way to make sure that I would never be lonely on a wave,” he explains of his newfound friendship.

Despite the clogged lineups, Kai has been determined to better his surf game, and the results are starting to show, as he currently sits in first in the ISF High School Men’s Long Board division.

When he’s not dodging donkey’s and dorks at the Point, Kai uses his focus for sports,school, and volunteer work. As a Junior at Harbor High school, Kai currently holds down a 3.7 GPA, plays on the Water Polo Team and swims with the Varsity swim team. He also volunteers as a surfing escort with the Ride A Wave Program, which allows disabled and/or disadvantaged children and adults to experience the ocean and ocean-related activities.

With a good head on his shoulders, and talent to spare, Kai is on track to establish himself as an esteemed and respected Santa Cruz surfer in no time.

Friday, November 7, 2008

SC LEGENDS


ADAM REPLOGLE, AKA ROADIE


Adam Replogle began his journey as a Santa Cruz surfer as a mere tadpole, wriggling his way down the line at his favorite break, 1st Jetty in Capitola. Cappy is a traditional training ground for the region's aquatic youth, and helped develop young Adam's developing skills. Those skills improved when Adam took his pint sized act to the reeling rights found at Pleasure Point. As he grew, young Roadie developed an intimate relationship with the Point, surfing the place religiously and passionately. In return the Point has blessed him with one of the smoothest, tack sharp, powerful, and graceful style found on the planet. Roadie remains one of Santa Cruz's most accomplished professional surfers, a former World Tour competitor who proved his worth in stunning displays of power and flow at venues such as Jeffrey's Bay in South Africa. Nowadays, Roadie is busy raising a family, and running his successful Billabong Surf Shop. In between mentoring young grommets like Nic H'dez and his obligations to his work and family, Roadie still finds time to skirk out to the Point and blow every one's mind with his effortless shredding skills.

Community



The Core find a home
Neal Kearney - Sentinel correspondent
The Core has found a permanent home in Santa Cruz Skate Shop on 41st Avenue.



When Kim Clary started The Core in 2002, she had a clear vision what was needed for her nonprofit youth organization to succeed.

She knew the support of the community would be vital and that she would need entertaining and beneficial ideas for events and meetings. But finding a permanent home for the kids to hang out was key.

Now in its sixth year, The Core has grown tremendously thanks to community involvement packaged with a popular schedule of events including surf competitions like the Schralpfest and dodgeball tournaments.

Thanks to the generosity of Santa Cruz Skate Shop owner Danny Keith, starting today The Core will have a new home. Keith, a longtime supporter of The Core, has donated a section of his newly opened shop to the organization.

The area includes couches, a big-screen TV, an Xbox, a DVD player, foosball table, a ping-pong table and pool table. Eventually they plan to a homework computer station.

Fifteen-year-old Pleasure Point resident Seven Adams is one of many Core members eagerly awaiting the headquarters' grand opening.

"It means everything to the kids because if they are ever having a hard time at home or at school, or at life in general, they have somewhere to go and someone to talk to," Adams said.


"It's also a great place to go relax and just hang out with your friends in an accepting, fun and cool atmosphere."

Clary said she wanted to give kids something she never got to experience as a kid.

"Now that we have a full-time place to call our own, we can hang out every day," Clary said. "All I wanted when I was a teenager was a cool place to hang out with my friends because there really isn't that much to do in S.C. ... Now that I am a little older, I recognize the fact that if kids have a positive place to be and a great group to associate with, they are less likely to become involved in any of the number of negative things that entice our precious young people." Contact Neal Kearney at 429-2436 or jcopeland@santacruzsentinel.com.

If You Go
WHAT: The Core Open House. WHEN: 8 p.m. Friday. HOURS: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. WHERE: Santa Cruz Skate Shop, 912 41st Ave., Capitola. INFORMATION: 227-4204 or kim@kimclary.net.

Politix



PRESIDENT ELECT OBAMA!!!


Here at FrothSchpot we cannont express enough relief regarding the Nation's latest transfer of power. We had our Banana Boats rigged tight for an overseas exodus in case McLame had won. Now the midget slaves we had conscripted to man our sails can rest easy, as we aint goin no where! Hopefully we can turn the tide and erase all of the Bush scented skid marks from our national consciousness and work towards bringing about constructive change! America, Fuck Yah!

Friday, October 24, 2008

WQS UPDATE- CWC Day 3

Cold Water Classic: Local surfers turning up the heat against international field

Neal Kearney - Sentinel Correspondent

SANTA CRUZ -- Santa Cruz experienced some summer-like conditions Thursday during Day 3 of the O'Neill Cold Water Classic. But the warmth of the sun had nothing on the heat brought by local surfers.

Facing a flurry of explosive surfing from a highly skilled international contingency, Santa Cruz's best held its own. Ten local surfers reached the round of 64 either through surfing or seeding, and one has already claimed his spot in the round of 32.

Midtown surfer Jimmy Herrick continued his Cold Water campaign, placing second in his round-of-96 heat Thursday morning. Herrick, who surfed his way through the Local Trials, earned a berth into the round of 64 -- known as the money rounds because contestants are guaranteed to take home at least $700 -- by managing to lock in some significant scores.

"The waves were fun again today, and I was able to pick off a couple good ones," Herrick said.


"All the heats are tight here, so I'm just stoked to keep it going, so stoked to make the money round. Now I'll have some cash to spend when I head to Mexico in a couple weeks!"

Today, Herrick will have to shine, as he faces some stiff competition from Hawaii's Hank Gaskell and South Africa's Nicholas Godfrey.

Locals Josh Mulcoy, Omar Etcheverry, and Randy "The Kid" Bonds also made it through the round of 96, which was completed early in the day.

The first eight heats of money rounds kicked off as well, as the Lane continued to pump with fun surf. Kieran Horn and Bud Freitas were the only two Santa Cruz surfers to surf their round of 64 heats Thursday, with Freitas emerging as the sole survivor. Freitas laced a combination of carving slashes to win his heat in a convincing fashion.

"Local boy Bud Freitas really stepped it up. This event is his time to shine, and it looks like he's starting to put it together," said event commentator and Westside pro Peter Mel. "I know he's struggled in the past, so it's awesome to see him get on a roll with those first two heats. I think this next round [round of 32] will be a crucial. If he overcomes it, I'd say that he could bring it through to the final."

The remaining round of 64 heats begin today, with local surfers Nat Young, Jason Collins, and Noi Kaulukukui looking to start their Cold Water campaigns with a bang. Young and Collins will face up against up fellow local Josh Loya, as well as Huntington Beach's Brandon Guillmette, in a highly anticipated clash in today's first heat, which begins at 8 a.m. For Young, the heat is a chance to surf against local legends whom he has looked up to his whole life.

"I'm amped. The waves are good. I'm stoked that the forecast looks good for tomorrow," Young said. He added he's "really excited to surf against Rat and Loya, which is also cool because it means at least two locals will make it [to the next round]." The heats only get heavier from here on out, especially with international talent flooding the contest.

Surfers like South Africa's Quintin Jones and Australia's Nick Riley won their heats, joining a highly focused force of foreign performers eager to keep the title out of local hands.

Another standout performer Thursday morning was Kauai's Sebastian Zietz. Zietz, who just returned from a three-week stint in Bali, overcame the extreme change in conditions to post the highest single wave score of the event so far. Zietz unleashed a combination of fin-blasting tail drifts and power hacks to rack up the a score of 9.5 out of 10.

Mel said he wasn't surprised by Zietz's performance, noting his ability to excel in good surf.
"It's good to see Sebastian do his thing. He's proved his adeptness in point break surf before, with some great results at waves like Trestles in San Clemente," Mel said. "He's got flair, a knack for finding waves with scoring potential, and just looks really comfortable out there. He's one of my favorites to watch for sure."

Along with the international hotshots and a colorful cast of hometown heroes remaining in the event, a building Northwest swell ensures the weekend will be packed with excitement. Despite increased pressure from this onslaught of aggressive outsiders, it's a good bet the remaining locals will do their best to rise to the occasion and keep the heat on the competition.

Thursday, October 23, 2008

Community

Gailen Webb went all out in decorating his windjammer Bar in Aptos bar for... (Dan Coyro/Sentinel)

Little bar of horrors: Aptos's Windjammer features spooky Halloween decor

NEAL KEARNEY - Sentinel Correspondent


Mangled corpses hang limply from nooses. Disfigured demons tower threateningly, baring razor sharp teeth. Wicked witches leer, grasping broom sticks. These are some of the frightening new regulars being spotted lately at the Windjammer Cocktail Lounge in Aptos. And they are just a small sample of the elaborate Halloween-themed decorations that owner Gailen Webb has accumulated over the past six years.

Every October, Webb gets busy unpacking a plethora of over-the-top Halloween displays and decorations from storage. From menacing mutants to ghastly ghouls, Webb has just about every monster and ghost imaginable strung and propped up around the entire space. He's even gone as far as to utilize the building's unique loft feature above the bar, creating a mind-boggling, three-dimensional scene of fright and terror.

"Every year I get to look forward to setting this stuff up. I just get a kick out of it," Webb said proudly. "It all started during my long stint as a sales rep for Anheuser-Busch. Holidays are great times for businesses to offer theme-driven displays to attract customers' interest. I had a lot of fun doing the displays and all that, and once I became the owner of the Windjammer, I carried that enthusiasm over to my bar."

Stepping inside Webb's little bar of horrors, your brain is immediately overloaded with visual stimuli. A dizzying display of lights is strung intricately across the entire place. Your eyes are assailed by the lights, from neon orange to the always creepy black light. The use of the black light is especially effective in the loft display, a Fright Night scene in which the strobing black light illuminates the cob web ridden dead zone full of rotten zombies and grimacing skeletons.

A creature-feature gang of ghouls and monsters are strategically placed to create a jaw-dropping spooky atmosphere. But it doesn't stop there. The bar is chock full of Halloween displays and decorations, such as tombstones, zombie family portraits, and interactive displays, including a cackling, jiggling witch.

"It's gotten to the point that even the people who come in here every day notice something that they hadn't noticed before, and that's what makes it so cool. It's something that just builds on itself and gets more elaborate every year," says Webb, reflecting on what drives him to invest so much time and money every year to outdo his past efforts.


He estimates that he spends up 70 to 80 hours putting the decorations up, and 20 to 30 to take them down. It's a great deal of work, yet Webb knows that he can count on the support of the community, from donations or even input on how to enhance or tweak his elaborate setup.

The Windjammer isn't the only business in the Rancho del Mar shopping center that embraces the Halloween spirit. In fact, the entire complex hosts a Safe Halloween event, in which vendors pass out candy in a safe, friendly environment for the youngsters. The Windjammer also puts on a number of Halloween-inspired events, such as a pumpkin carving contest and costume parties all Halloween weekend.

Longtime Windjammer regular Rhonda Leonardo of Aptos looks forward to seeing what kind of craziness Webb can cook up when Halloween rolls around.

"You can tell that Gailen is really into pleasing his customers. The same also goes for every other time of the year, but Halloween he goes all out," Leonardo said. "It's a real family in here and Gailen truly takes pleasure in showing off his latest finds. He also gives a lot to the kids so it's a pretty neat thing."

Along with hosting a pumpkin carving contest for the kids, the Windjammer is also selling Pumpkin Pin-Ups for $1 or $5 in an effort to help raise money for St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

For Webb, seeing people's initial reaction to his spooky bar is the most gratifying part. "It's all about shock and awe, and every year we continue our all out approach and try to make it a little different. It's always hard to beat the year before, but we're always finding ways to outdo ourselves every time Halloween rolls around."

Wednesday, October 22, 2008

WQS update- CWC Day 1

Midtown surfer Jimmy Herrick plants a hand as he plans his next move during the second semi final for locals. Herrick advanced and will surf Wednesday

SANTA CRUZ SURFERS OWN DAY ONE OF O'NEILL COLDWATER CLASSIC

By Neal KearneySentinel Correspondent

SANTA CRUZ — Santa Cruz has become a cauldron of surfing overflowing with talent. With upstarts like Anthony Tashnick and Noi Kaulukukui bubbling up behind legends like Peter Mel and Adam Replogle, there is little room for upward mobility for lesser-known surfers. Sometimes, truly gifted surfers get left in the shadows. The O’Neill Coldwater Classic at Steamer Lane, which began Tuesday under blue skies and highly contestable conditions, is a golden opportunity for such under-rated surfers to put on their “A” game and show the world their stuff. Jimmy Herrick is one of those surfers. Herrick, a 23-year-old Santa Cruz native, has developed a reputation among the Santa Cruz surf community as an amped and ambitious waterman, known to step it up no matter what the ocean throws his way. Although respected, Herrick rarely receives recognition for his efforts, watching on the sidelines as the Santa Cruz elite enjoy high-profile sponsorships and extensive media play.On Tuesday, Herrick seized the spotlight. He moved on in all three heats he surfed, advancing all the way to the round of 128 from the Local Trials. Russell Smith, Nic Lamb and Joe Hutson also advanced into the main event out of the Local Trials — established to thin out the glut of talented Santa Cruz surfers wanting to compete in the contest. By the end of the day, only Russell and Herrick had earned the right to surf today.In his heats, Herrick used his backhand to deliver a blistering assault of off-the-top maneuvers, surfing his waves with vigor in an clearly inspired performance.“Jimmy was really ripping,” said former Cold Water champion Kieran Horn during an afternoon session at Pleasure Point, where he was practicing for his first heat Thursday at Steamer Lane. Horn is a seeded surfer, meaning he earned enough points in other World Qualifying Series events to be placed directly into the round of 64. Like Herrick, Carmel native Johnny Craft made his heat Tuesday, and will continue today in the round of 128, which is scheduled to begin at 8 a.m.“I’ve never seen Jimmy surf like that, it was sick!” Craft said of Herrick. “It’s good to see him blow up like that.”A slew of Santa Cruz shredders successfully advanced through to the round of 128. They proved their familiarity with the waters by negotiating the Lane’s warbly walls and tricky backwash. Among them Ashton Madeley, Josh Loya, Omar Etcheverry, Randy Bonds, TJ Mikus, Brandon Barnes, Josh Mulcoy and Matthew Myers.Throughout the week, other Santa Cruz favorites will join in the fray. Mel, Bud Freitas and the always lethal Jason “Ratboy” Collins will be looking to stamp their authority and return the CWC trophy to local hands. Horn was the last local to win it, doing so in 2003. Last year Jordy Smith of South Africa claimed the CWC title. For Herrick, the challenge is to carry his current consistency through to future heats and stay focused throughout the event. “It’s so hard to make these heats, especially the trials this morning — so many good surfers,” he said. “But I’m psyched to advance and watch some of my friends, like Myers and Mulcoy, do good. I think we feed off each other, and it’s good to see the boys advance.” With a highly talented international field in town to hold the local crew at bay, Herrick has definitely got his work cut out for him. However, if he keeps it up, he just might find himself in contention for a CWC title, and a secure place within Santa Cruz’s surfing lore.Contact Neal Kearney at sports@santacruzsentinel.com.

Wednesday, October 15, 2008

Community

Gromz.com Alumni Jimmy Herrick blowing tail
As a youth, Gromz.com founder Jason Miller was like any other surf psyched grommet coming up in the ultra competitive talent pool. He had the desire and determination to make something out of his surfing. Although Miller developed a mean gaff and gained extensive tube knowledge, he found his calling in the sales industry. Around this time Miller launched Gromz.com, a talent agency for young extreme athletes, in which they can promote themselves, creating profiles with pictures and biographical information. Miller created the site because he wished he had something similar when he was a grom. Miller has recently re-vamped the site, and if your a frothing little guy it would be in your best interest to scope it and join ASAP. As a former Gromz.com member, I cannot praise the site enough, as it was a big deal for me as a grub to have my skills recognized on a sick website made just for groms. Check out the site at www.Gromz.com








Pass The Green!

Hey Chad, Pass the Green! ph.mikeJones Azhiaziam

Even before Sean Penn graced the screens in Fast Times at Ridgemont High as Jeff Spicoli, the zorbed out beach bum, the public's perception of surfer's has been that of stoned, out of touch, out of reach degenerates. In many respects, this view had it's merits. The 1960's and 70's were a time of experimentation and drug use, and surfer's, with their free lifestyles and unique personalities, were no exception. Many surfers of the era, including such big names as Michael Peterson and Cheyne Horan, have admitted to being heavily doped up even at the peak of their career.

It was Spicoli, however, who cemented the stoned out, surf bum image into that of the popular imagination. Since then, most depictions of surfer's in the media have been that of ripped space cadets on a search for munchies, glossy eyed numbskulls whose primary function is to provide comic relief. Such stereotypes have negatively affected hopes for the legitimization of surfing. You know what I say? I say that surfer's should embrace the Cannabis connection. After all, these days Green is in, and companies of every sort are scrambling to incorporate any kind of eco-friendly components into their products. A handful of large surf companies have integrated "Green" or eco-friendly aspects into their marketing campaign (think board shorts made from recycled bottles, etc), and the rest of the industry has taken notice.

Like all fads and crazes, this environmental push started with dedicated individuals, whose motives reflect a deep concern for the preservation of the Earth, not a desire to keep up with the latest movements. For these environmentalists, while this shift to eco-consciousness has been long overdue, it allows them to bring their product to the mainstream. Meet Los Osos, California's Chad Jackson, a year old surfer/shaper who aims to advocate awareness with his eco-friendly, hemp surfboards. Along with his shaping, Chad is an experienced waterman, and he swears by his hemp boards in all conditions, from 2' to 20'. I recently caught up with Chad in his shaping room in Los Osos, to discuss his love for nature, sources of inspiration, and where he plans to take his hemp based surfboard revolution.

Neal-How did you get involved?
Chad-I have always been a nature freak growing up in the beautiful central cal and hawaii, and have had a dream since I was about 17 to link the environmental movement to the surfing world and help change the world at large. I went to Cal Poly SLO for 8 years studying physics and engineering until finally graduating under Earth Sciences, where my professors beat into me the problems our generation will face and how we can solve them with science. I have now committed my life to being a leader in the environmental movement through surfing, traveling and networking.

NK-What kinds of materials are you using and where do they come from?
CJ-I am shaping blanks made from soybean oil and sugarcane oil, biofoam and ice-9 respectively. They are 100% non-petroleum and are getting closer and closer to being equivalent in strength and performance to the old clark foam. A few years ago I linked up with Neftali Espino, a surfer-shaper like myself, and Aaron Carvajal, owner of USHempCo. Nef and I were laminating regular surfboards with hemp cloth we were getting from Aaron. 3 years later, the dust has cleared and I am now grassing non-petrol blanks with hemp cloth and finishing them with a non-petrol resin. The result is the first high performance fully functional eco-board the world has seen. I am partnered up with USHempCo and another company Local, and we are bringing these boards and a whole line of hemp clothing to the market and the surf industry. I have been riding these boards for a year now and I am able to ride the tube as deep as ever and whip airs like I am on a surftech popout.

NK-How does your archaelogy training and interest in Indian life and culture fit in? (maybe somethin about Indians living off the land, using organic materials and such, benefits of hemp etc?)
CJ-I have been doing archeology on the central coast with the Chumash and Salinan Indians for 4 years, a nice escape from the uber-hype of the surf scene. This has definitely cultivated an even stronger connection for me to the land, ocean and culture of indigenous peoples. The link between these cultures and the land and ocean is inseparable. Like the Polynesians and other maritime cultures there is and always has been a fine line between living in harmony and over-exploiting the natural resources of an area. The Native Americans lived by the rule of the seventh generation. It meant that they only harvested the resources of nature to the extent that there would still be ample supply for six more generations into the future ensuring that the seventh generation would enjoy the same bountifulness as the current generation. Ya think George Bush and the powers that be are taking this into consideration? More like fuck the future I'm gonna get mine. There is an inner-sense of comfort you feel when working among old Indian sites. You imagine the same peacefulness that exists in some Asian cultures where every chore is done with utmost care and flow always grateful for the gifts nature provides for us. Also inherent is the remembrance of defeat and conquest of the people and the loss of their way of life. All this motivates me and others to protect and bring back the ways of the Indian and indigenous cultures the world over. Hemp can play a big role in this as many indigenous cultures can grow hemp on their reservations for industrial uses. Hemp can grow on the most impoverished of lands and can reclaim non-fertile soils in a few years. The thousand of uses for the hemp plant, its vigor and its magic make it the number one plant to turn around global warming and replace petro-chemicals with bio-based polymers, fuels, fibers and food.

NK-Where do you plan on taking your board building?
CJ-I am going to continue bringing in new bio-technology as it is perfected and market the boards to the world at large. We are going BIG with this and one thing is myself and my team riders are going to travel and compete and blow minds in and out of the water basically proving that these boards perform identical to petrol boards, so it will be a no-brainer.

NK-How does working with hemp differ from fiberglass?
CJ-A little harder to saturate and sand, but the micro dust is nowhere near as toxic and bad for the user.

NK-What are the benefits of eco-friendly board building?
CJ-Less impact on the respiratory and skin of the user and of course way better for the environment and economy.

NK-What do you see boards being made with say 50 years in the future?
CJ-Full on bio, not one speck of petroleum and possibly surfboards being grown on trees.


Sunday, October 12, 2008

Little Shit's


Growing up in the Hater capital of the world, AKA Santa Cruz, one must develop a thick skin a young age. Despite the beautiful landscape and perfect surf, it seems that everyone’s got a chip on their shoulder. Heckles and taunts are as predictable as ice cream headaches around here, and there are countless individuals who would jump at the chance to belittle even their closest of friends. Of those affected, grommets suffer from this hazing the most. Due to their naivety and inability to fight back, there’s little they can do to avoid the wrath of their disgruntled elders.
Now imagine being a grom that also happens to long board. The possibilities for ridicule and torture are endless. Young SC upstart Kyle Jouras doesn’t seem to let such stigma affect him. He’s too psyched on surfing to really give a damn. Over the past few years, Kyle has earned a place in the lineup at Pleasure Point, amazing those who witness his progressive approach to long boarding. His style combines a mix of old school cruising with a dose of spinning and slashing new school maneuvers. Much like the late great Jay Moriarity, Kyle’s positive and respectful attitude supersedes the fact that he happens to long board. Here at Frothschpot, we can’t help but wonder what kind of damage Kyle could dish out if he jumped on a short board. For now however, it seems Kyle is content with the couple extra feet, and the way he’s been ripping lately it’s hard to hold it against him.

What's The Deal?


What’s the deal with this cold water? Last week we were frolicking joyfully in the breakers wearing nothing but our knickers. Now, judging by the way our testicles have retreated into the depths of our stomach’s, it’s safe to say Fall is here. The flurry of chilly, windy weather we’ve been experiencing has done a good job blowing off the top layer of the ocean’s warm water, resulting in a wicked upwelling that has turned the water icy. For us surfers, Fall and the onset of winter are good omens. However, such a drastic change in water temp is a cruel reminder of the extreme nature of winter time. Time to bust out the 5/4/3!

Industry Notes


Sollife news July-August ‘08

This is a bi-monthly newsletter catching you up on the going ons of sollifesurfboards and the worldwide group of characters associated with the brand. Australia, well, winter is made a bold statement this year! A lot of good winter waves around the country but not much on the Goldcoast.Perth team rider Mitch Taylor has been scoring a lot of good waves up and down the west coast. MNM boardriders had their august comp with the Pirie family, Dave,Lance and Calvin all representing sollife with division wins!!! Wollongong sollife team rider CobyNau spent some time getting shacked all over indo, before coming home to Woonona wedges and scoring a perfect 10 in the boardriders!!! Congrats Coby. Coach Bazza Stace reckons Cobys surfing has gone through the roof since he joined the sollife family.We are stoked he is part of it and look forward to big things from Coby over the next few years.
We have just about finished the new factory showroom remodel at our Kirra factory. The new space has some promo pics of sollife riders and a nice board display. We have a lounge area where you can watch vids and talk surfboards. There is also a great display of fins from arcade. A wide range of mal fins as well as fcs replacement helite fins, glass on helites and beautiful polished fiberglass quads and twins for future boxes. So come on in and check it out. Everyone is welcome. The address is 11-13 #3 Ourimbah Rd. Tweed Heads.We are the first factories on your left after you turn down Ourimbah Rd. In Europe, our top intl. team rider and sollife family member Damien Chaudoy has been ripping! He started the ASP euro tour with a couple of 5ths and is one result shy right now of qualifying for the ASP junior world champs in Narrabeen in January!!!Go Damien!!! 1 event left, Damien is only 18 though so he does have two more years in the division. He has also been loving his new epoxy board! Says it is great for airs and fly’s over dead sections!!! Former sollife team rider, and family member for life Che Stang from California was cool enough to take Damien’s boards over to him on his way to three European WQS events. We are hoping to get Che back on sollife sometime very soon. Damien will be surfing in the last junior in Portugal and the 6 star there next month, then home to Reunion island for a family catch up before returning to Australia via Hawaii to train for next season and get fresh boards. He loves snapper and will be out there all summer getting shacked behind the rock. California is the place sollife shaper Scott Crump spent most of July and August scoring some fun but smelly surf and shaping in Oceanside. Sunny Garcia was spotted ripping on his sollife and WQS ripper Nate Yeomens of rusty ordered up a weapon or two. Scott watched the USopen and visited some accounts, shaping a lot of custom boards for the crew there and doing some of our new modern mal models too!Santa Cruz sollife family member Neal Kearney spent most of the northern hemisphere summer scoring barrels in Bali!!! Padang Padang was a fav as was keramas.He scored an epic backhand vert shot at Keramas, we are using it in our new Surfshot(California mag) ad for next month.Neal also scored some pics in the new mondo rad magazine.He writes for the mags as well as blows up in the surf…talented dude! You will be seeing a lot more of sollife in surfshot this coming year.While in California Scott secured a factory partnership for sollife, giving us an awesome place to make boards and service our accounts there. Scott will be spending a lot more time there over the next couple of years pumping up the southern and northern California markets. Brian Tognozzi from Pacifica has been spotted absolutely tearing on a fresh sollife that our nor cal distributor Mike Marshall hooked him up with. B.T. is a big talent coming out of the foggy region…we are amped to have him representing for sollife up there. Ok…that’s the wrap. Keep an eye out for our revamped http://www.sollifesurfboards.com/ website. And check out www.myspace.com/sollifesurfboards for an interview with shaper scott crump about our new epoxy model board. They go off!!!

Sunday, September 28, 2008

Little Shits

"Don't call me Runt!" photo- Wilson


This featured Little Shit has some pretty big shoes to fill. Literally. Anthony Dunn's pop's is Peter Mel, world renowned big wave surfer, commentator, and giant human. With the nickname "Runt", it seemed as though young Anthony might not live up to the stocky 6 foot+ frame of his dad. As of late, however, Dunn has experienced quite a growth spurt and it seems as though he may be ready to one day ditch the Runt nickname. Dunn has always been a frothed out grommet, with a stretched out grin permanently splitting his freckled mug, seen milking tiny reforms with his crew of little hell raisers. Nowadays, Dunn is a junior in high school, hangs with the big boys, and has been seen throwing a little more spray and dropping in on bigger waves. In fact, last Winter I saw little Dunn air drop a pretty heavy left hander at a pretty heavy unnamed East Side slab. Dunn has put on some inches, now it's time for him to put on the lbs, and with that, I figure he'll continue to turn heads and make a name for himself in surfing. He may be Dunn, but he ain't done yet!

SC LEGENDS

Who's your Daddy? photo- Reuben Ruiz

Who’s on it? Ruff’s on it. Always. In fact, he’s been on it for over two decades, ruling SC since most of you were suckling on your mother’s teat. Anthony Ruffo has attained top dawg status here in Santa Cruz, achieving respect and admiration for his dedicated, all or nothing approach to surfing. From Big Sur to San Francisco, Ruffo can be found wherever the waves are pumping, and is commonly spotted sussing out obscure sandbars and reefs in his black truck. Ruff’s knack for finding nugs is a result of his experiences scouring the coast line looking for ride able surf when Santa Cruz isn’t producing. He knows this coast like the back of his hand. Speaking of backsides, Ruff’s got one of the most polished and eye pleasing styles in town. No. I’m not talking about his rear end, although homeboy is in pretty good shape. Ruff’s low center of gravity and smooth bottom turn’s are a staple at Steamer Lane, and he uses them to slingshot himself off the Slot for vicious vertical hacks and unnerving under the lip gaffs. Though he’s a born and raised West Sider for life, Ruffo is boys with pretty much everyone in Santa Cruz. This universal approach to friendship and comradery is something Ruff’s known for, and is reflected in his start-up clothing company, Allsydz Clothing. Allsydz recognizes strength in unity, and emphasizes Santa Cruz’s importance as a whole. Santa Cruz may be divided by theoretical “sides”, but when it comes down to it, we’re all a family, and all “sides” constitute one united Santa Cruz. In short, Ruffo rules Santa Cruz and beyond, and shows no signs of slowing down, so remember to respect this SC Legend.

Saturday, September 13, 2008

SCHPOT CHECK- BALI

Close to Heaven

Within the island chain of Indonesia lies an place like no other. Long has it enticed foreign travelers, with it’s tropical clime and stunning landscape. The first outsiders to stake claim to the island paradise known as Bali were Dutch traders, who utilized the land as a colonial outpost. The first surfers to explore it where a group of young Australian adventurer’s in the 1970’s, who were stunned to find such superb surf, so close to home. Since then, surfers of all nationalities have flocked to Bali to test their skill in its challenging surf, and immerse themselves in its rich, exotic culture.

Nowadays, Bali is transforming rapidly. Development and expansion have grown exponentially, and places, which have existed for hundreds of years as self-sustaining agricultural communities, are quickly becoming restaurants and shopping centers. Lush forests have given way to concrete monstrosities, the once simple landscape reshaped to suit the needs of a burgeoning tourist economy.

For traveling surfers, this change has resulted in a kind of Disneyland experience. Not only are the waves some of the best the world has to offer, but also there are numerous options for pleasure when the waves aren’t happening. There’s no limit to the number of ways to spend your time in Bali, and depending on your individual taste and preference, it could be a many number of things.

Bali Lush's


If partying is thing, you won’t be disappointed. There’s no shortage of discotheques and clubs of every type in the urban hub of Kuta to get your groove on in. You might decide to go high class and sip Cosmo’s at sunset at the ultra expensive Ku De Ta. Or you may find the flashing strobe lights and thumping electro-house music of the Sky Garden more to your liking. After midnight and enough stiff drinks, you could always make your way to the Bounty to mix it up with hundreds of sweaty, piss drunk Aussies and other assorted foreign youngsters.

Bounty Filth Fest



For the serious surfer, trying the healthy, low profile route could pay off when the surf picks up. There are tons of places to do yoga, get massaged, and eat healthy food throughout the island, and if you’re serious about fitness, there are a number of gyms available as well. The Bukit peninsula is a perfect place to escape the non-stop partying and pollution of Kuta.


Flat Padang Padang



If you brought your girlfriend or family along another option are tourist attractions. There’s shopping galore in Kuta, and in the mountains of Ubud, there’s an unbelievable outdoor marketplace, which offers arts and crafts of every make imaginable. If your feeling adventurous, you could go snorkeling, explore the monkey forest, or even experience a thrilling elephant ride.

Local Surf Check


For the inner carp in you, there’s a golf course in Sanur to practice your chip shots.
You can always do a little bit of everything, it’s all up to you. After all, in Bali, the choices are endless, much like the surf. Speaking of which, the locations and breaks are diverse, and there are many options on hand. You could shred Canguu, a sand reef combination with wedges on tap built for silly punts. Then again you might feel like mixing it up at Kuta beach, where you can sample some pretty fun beach breaks and hit on hot European surfer girls at the same time.

Ya Im from Germany. Can you teach me surfing?


On the Bukit there are a few spots to choose from, namely Bingin, Padang Padang, and Uluwatu, all classic waves that will surely test your courage and breath holding skills. Newly discovered breaks on the Sanur side of the island can hold some serious waves when conditions are shot elsewhere.

Bukit Boyz- DP, EG, ND

Bali is a great central location for heading out into the various wave rich islands Indonesia. There’s a multitude of places to head, and depending on the swell, wind patterns, and your budget, there’s no shortage of choices. Favorites include; Lombok, Sumbawa, Mentawaii’s, and Sumatra, just to name a few. You could score, and you could just as easily get skunked, the risk is all part of the adventure. You might come back to Bali boasting to all your buddies of the perfect tubes you got at Lance’s Right, or just as easily return empty handed only to hear stories of double overhead tube’s at Padang Padang. It’s a roll of the dice.


Don't wanna miss out on this!

With all this being said, it’s easy to forget your place of privilege in such an impoverished, third world country. It doesn’t take long before you start bitching at a vendor over a purchase that may cost you a matter of dollars more. Any tourist with enough money to travel to Bali is wealthy in comparison to your average Balinese. What’s worse is that these hard-pressed people are steadily becoming poorer. This is largely due to an widespread loss of land, which is being sold dirt-cheap to foreign investors, who are grabbing up land with a quickness to build luxury villas for wealthy tourists.

To the Balinese, the chance of making a few hundred thousand dollars for their ancestral land is similar to dangling a T-bone steak in front of a starving Ethiopian. The quick payoff is far too enticing to pass up. What results, however, is the loss of land held by Balinese for generations, along with a loss of tradition and culture. Huge swaths of land once grazed upon by Water Buffalo and the vast rice paddies tended as a function of family tradition, are being leveled, turned into immense mansion complexes that the Balinese simply cannot afford.

Land like this is being bought up with the quickness

In simple terms, the Balinese are being bought off their land, unfairly enticed by foreign investors with deep pockets. This is happening at an alarming rate, and the growth is showing no signs of slowing. This reality is tragic to behold, as the gentle nature of the Balinese does not warrant such unjust treatment.

The best thing we, as surfers and visitors to the beautiful land of Bali can do to help is to spend our money there. Tourism is the driving force behind the prosperity of the Balinese, and by buying their trinkets, food, art, and services, we are helping them feed their families.
Bali is a wonderful place to visit, and if you decide to come, bring a respectful attitude, some gear to give away to the local groms before you leave, and a little extra spending money to tip your taxi driver, as he most likely needs it more than you.

FEATURED ARTIST- FJ ANDERSON



Emerald Energy

The vision's one beholds while surfing are unforgettable. Throwing lips, of all shades of green and blue, pitch their curtains in stunning displays of form and beauty. Peering into the vortex of a barrelling wave, one can't help but become mesmerized by the sight. Being so close to the power of Mother Nature is exhilarating. Attempting to describe such experiences to outsiders is almost an impossible task. FJ Anderson, a twenty three year old Santa Cruz native, is using his superb artistic skills to convey such experiences to the public.


Black's Beach




FJ has a degree in Art from UCSC, and is working hard to establish his reputation as one of the premiere artistic talents in Santa Cruz. FJ's art is currently being displayed at Olita's Resturaunt on the Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf, and he also has a website at http://www.fjartwork.com/. If you are a surfer, Santa Cruz local, or simply anyone who enjoys fine art check out FJ's amazing artwork ASAP!



Pitching

WHO DAT??? JESSE COLOMBO

Colombo. Stroking the Corn



There’s a fine young man coming up out of the highly competitive Santa Cruz surf community. He’s a freckled faced fanatic with a penchant for towering tubes and altitude altering aerials. He’s Jesse Colombo, and you’d be hard pressed to encounter a single soul within the Santa Cruz surf scene not familiar with the kid’s enthusiasm and surf stoke. Lately Jesse has been expanding his presence beyond the limits of Santa Cruz county, traveling to remote destinations to capture images of his signature style in action. His hard work is paying off, and by flipping through any established surf magazine, you will see why. I recently caught up with Jesse to discuss life.


NK- I just want to tell you straight off that Santa Cruz just wouldn't be the same with out you, Jesse. This leads me to ask you what you think it is that makes Santa Cruz surfers such a unique family, and what it means to you to be a part of such a close knit crew of surfers on the come up?





JC-It s cool, having good surfers to grow up with is motivating to try harder. NK- Lets get some background info goin. When and how did you start surfing? JC- With some friends at 38th when I was 10 or 11





NK- You seem to know everyone in Santa Cruz, but is there an inner crew that you usually roll with?





JC- I like to roll with Bud, Rat, Kieran Horn cause we all golf and push each other in and out of the water. also some of the kids that are younger than me get me amped too





NK- I'm gonna name some of your favorite things. Discuss each as I read them-





-Airs-


JC- Hard, cool if done in moderation





-The Harbor-


JC-Scary, exciting, pushing yourself



-Girls-


JC-Yes Please



-Bud Freitas-


JC- Flake, ripper, A-D-D to a level I thought wasn’t possible





-Kooks-


JC- I’m the biggest one



NK- Whets your plans for the future? Are you gonna continue with the photo trips or begin to focus on competitive surfing?



JC- Both, a good result would feel nice though, I think, I’ve never made a heat


NK- How would you describe your relationship with the ocean?





JC- Bi-polar, all and all good though



NK- Any thoughts on the recent Great White Shark attack just south of Santa Cruz?





JC- Cant wait to bring Bud down there and make him surf, he loves sharks, super comfortable knowing they are around



NK- Any shout outs?





JC-Everyone, you all rip






Dress Rehearsal for his new childrens show, Colombo's Corner

SCHPOT CHECK!!! Mainland Mex


On the Search in Mainland Mex. all photos Corey Wilson

For West Coast surfers desperate to get a fix of powerful, top-to-bottom waves, traveling to Hawaii, Indonesia, or Tahiti can prove costly and exhausting. Luckily there's always the option of heading down to our wave rich southern neighbor, Mexico.

Grinds

For those only familiar with the dry, temperate climate of Baja, Mainland Mexico is a completely different story, complete with lush jungles and extremely warm water temp's. The region is large, encompassing a number of states with hundreds of miles of surf able coastline.

Tequila Sunset

From peeling points to ridiculously round river mouths, Mainland Mexico has it all. Flights from California are relatively cheap, as are dining and lodging expenses. The people of Mexico may lack material wealth, yet make up for it in the richness of their culture and friendly attitudes. Miles and miles of untapped coastline leaves plenty of options for explorers searching for some adventure and solitude. Mainland Mexico serves as a great escape for any West Coast surfer looking for some cheap thrills.



Hay Muchos Tubos Aqui





Thursday, September 11, 2008

Inside You

Inside. photo-Wilson


I want to be inside you. Please let me in. I want to enter you, to join our bodies as one. I want to feel your curves, ride your currents. If you would let me, I would stay inside you forever. Once inside, time stands still, my senses numbed, overwhelmed by the immense pleasure you provide.
There have been others. Every one characterized by the same fleeting feeling of immeasurable bliss. Every time a unique experience, a different ride. Please let me slide in. Allow me to navigate your inside in it’s entirety, all the while stroking you gently, slowing my pace ever so slightly to adjust to your unpredictable rhythms.
Should I fail to tame you, the fault is mine. But that’s why I love you, barrel. Ultimately, it is up to me to see our union to completion. Therefore I must analyze your ever changing moods, plotting my next entrance. I want to be inside you. Oh, glorious tube, please let me in.

Featured Artist: Corey Wilson




Corn-Nut, in his element

Featured Artist- Corey Wilson. Age-19. Hometown-Santa Cruz, California.


Corey Wilson is quickly ascending the ranks as one of Santa Cruz's most skilled photographers. Growing up on Santa Cruz's East Side, Corey had always loved the water, and spent much of his grommethood immersed in the surf found at Sunny Cove and Santa Maria's. It wasn't until high school, however, that Corey combined his love for the ocean and photography into a career. It's amazing to see how much Corey's work has progressed, and how quickly at that. He currently is having a great year, with tons of contributions to Surfshot Magazine and Mundo Rad. Corey's got a huge future in front of him so do yourself a favor and check out some of his stunning images at- www.coreywilsonphotography.com

Darshan Gooch, Puerto Escondido '08 -photo-Wilson








Question of the Day!

Henards creepin for a bargain at the Flea

QUESTION-What do you do to keep busy during the flat summer days here in Santa Cruz?

Homer Henard- "Scribe aroud the Sk8 Park. Hit the flea market..Look 4 a twinnie ....Cross training is a Mandatory!...L8night Ab workouts are a must as well...Theres always waves in the bay area if you know where to go!!! Obvys"

Wednesday, September 10, 2008

Slater....We need you!!!!


Every classroom has one. The obsessed know-it-all who frantically thrusts his hand high into the air whenever the teacher poses a question. Arm erect, quivering with anticipation, nerds like this thrive off showing their cranial competency, sometimes even proving the teacher wrong. Sharing a classroom with a braniac like this can inspire you to put down your Gameboy and step up your game, if only to prove the Einstein wrong only once or twice.
This response makes perfect sense. When competing with someone whose experience and skill is on a higher level than your own, you tend to bring up your own effort and performance, as the bar has been raised. This could be said about the surfers competing against Kelly Slater on this year’s World Championship Tour. Slater is the aging vet whose untouchable talent and freakish skill just never seems to cease. He’s like the know-it- all in class who everyone wants to prove wrong, who, instead of pimples and a pocket protector, sports a bald head and white wetsuits.
Take this year’s Quiksilver Pro on Australia‘s Gold Coast, which went down in rippable three-to four-foot Snapper Rocks. Kelly was crushing his opponents, surfing with such swagger that he seemed to be almost toying with his opponents. Case in point: Kelly’s quarterfinal heat with Andy Irons. With only a few minutes remaining, Kelly had AI on the ropes, needing a combination of 9.0 plus rides. AI, despite putting on an inspired performance, buckled under Slater’s unstoppable onslaught, and had to settle for an =5th place result. To rub it in, Slater took off switch, proceeding to link up a number of backside maneuvers straight through to Rainbow Bay, drawing huge cheers from the crowd.
This type of confident dominance is exactly what the boys on tour need. Something tells me that AI was watching Kelly’s switch victory lap, and you can bet that this has fueled his competitive fire for their next encounter. Like him or not, Kelly blows up whenever he dons a contest singlet, and he similarly keeps the standard hovering above most’s heads, painfully out of reach.
Unlike his untouchable dominance of the 1990’s however, Kelly is going to have his work cut out for him to remain surfing’s gold standard. The young prospects on tour on tour are fired up, and they have made their intentions clear. Blistering performances by the likes of Bede Durbridge, Ace Buchan, Jeremey Flores, and Adriano De Souza are keeping the favorites on the defense, showing their determination to shake up the old guard.
Then there’s the Dane and Jordy show. Both young men regularly put on stunning displays of technical, powerful, and radical surfing, performances which undoubtedly leave the judges scratching their heads as how to score this new, balls-out approach to contest surfing. It’s the dream of everyone on tour to take out Kelly in a one-on-one heat, and just by being there he is creating an atmosphere that pushes everyone to attempt the unthinkable and go for broke. In turn, professional surfing has become more exciting to watch. Kelly remains the man everyone loves to hate. We hate to see him casually win everything he enters, but at the same time it’s impossible not to love the incredible show he puts on. As a fan of radical surfing, I beg you Kelly, go for 10. Until someone steps up to take your place as Boss Hog, pro surfing needs you around to keep the level

Want To Be a Part of the Froth?




Everybody froths. From your 80 year old grandma getting pumped on the latest in denture technology, to your 3 year old cousin amping on a sticky new discovery underneath the sofa. Part of the mission of FrothSchpot, is to let you express your froth. Send us your stories, photos, art, opinions, and whatever the fuck else you wanna share. We'll try our best to include your creative contribution's to the site. So what are you waiting for? Start Frothing! email contributions to nealdude@calcentral.com

I Love Lakey's





















Sometimes just getting there is half the fun. Well that is if you consider hectic, scrambled, stress-filled journey's fun. Surf trips are a roll of the dice, and sometimes all the planning, preparation, and supposed foresight in the world can quickly unravel into a race against time and all odds. Enduring such setbacks and hardships makes the pay off that much sweeter, as me, Matt Myers, Kyle Thiermann and TJ Mikus found on a recent trip to Sumbawa.


The crew had been enjoying a leisurely vacation in Bali, eating great, enjoying the sunny weather, and surfing at our own leisure. One day, however, we got an opportunity to experience a change of scenery.We spoke with resident photographer Hamish Humphrey's and his swell reports and inside knowledge led him to invite us on a short trip to Sumbawa, an island located about an hour plane ride from Bali.


From the airport it would onlybe a two hour drive to, Lakey Peak, our base camp. This news excited me greatly, as I had heard numerous stories of the perfect waves found therein. We were all frothing at a chance to surf the Peak, a welcome change to the locales of Bali, which had lost their initial charmand intrigue. Hamish told us that we could buy our tickets right before theplane took off, and it would be a simple process. We retired the nightbefore, hoping for a deep slumber to prepare us for our long day oftraveling the next day.


It turns out Kyle had ordered some fish that had been prepared incorrectly at dinner that night. He was up all night, wretching and dry heaving, with a horrible stomach ache. Matt had to share a room with him and was similarly kept up all night by the painful sounds of Kyle's traumatic food poisoning. We set out for the airport, hopeful that after we got to Sumbawa and enjoyed some liquid therapy, Kyle would bounce back. Never the less, he sat by the window. We arrived at the airport to an unsettling realization. The ATM machine was out of money. We scrambled frantically, trying to scrape up enough funds between all of us to get us in the air. It was useless. With time ticking away, we rushed to the ticket counter to see if they took credit cards.After much conversation, they gave in to our request and Kyle threw down his credit card on the counter. We were in.


We had ten minutes until the plane took off when we made it through baggage check. We raced up the many flights of stairs, sweating and cursing our badluck, panting like sun baked canines. Our last stop before the plane wasthe metal detector. Five minutes to go. TJ had been lucky enough to forget his giant Swiss army knife stashed away in his backpack, and the metal detector went haywire. Three minutes to go. The Security Guard started rambling in Balinese, but luckily Hamish spoke the language. He found outthat the knife would have to be checked in back at the ticket counter. Two minutes. Hamish took matters into his own hands and rushed full speed down the escalator like a cheetah on the plains of Africa, and returned in a matter of seconds, bearing a thumbs up sign anda wide grin. One minute. We jetted down outside and made our way to the airplane.


Some kind of official was pacing by the doors of the plane, glaring at his watch in frustration. Apparently someone had let the crew know that we were getting there late. He led us aboard and we all let out asigh of relief. Kyle was puffing and didn't look so good. We had made it though, and the feeling was immense. The flight was relatively painless, and we got to Sumbawa in under an hour. From the airport, we hired a driver to get us to Lakey's, and we set out on our two hour drive. The scenery was awesome, rolling green hills which gave way to windy mountainous roads, dotted with lean-to huts of the most precarious builds.


We arrived at Lakey's sweating and longing for lunch, anap, and late afternoon surf. By this time Kyle looked a little bitbetter, the color slowly returning to his face. The workers at the Hotel we were staying at took our bags, and we followed them to our rooms. Just minutes later, Matt came to the realization that we had left our boardstraps with the driver. We wouldn't ever see him again, and the straps were necessary for getting our boards back home. Matt rushed outside and found a local with a motorbike. He paid him five dollars, jumped on the back of his motorbike and they tore off, leaving a giant cloud of dust.


What ensued was a high speed, highly dangerous chase, with Matt clinging for life to the driver,who was laughing maniacally through the whole ordeal. Luckily, they were able to hail the driver and retrieve the straps, but by the look of Matt's face upon his return, he had almost died a number of times. With the stress of travel behind us, we sat down to a delicious meal of strawberry milkshakes and cheese pizza, looking out directly into Lakey Peak, which was firing on all cylinders. A new life and sense of purpose was regained by all, and by this point Kyle was looking healthy as ever.Something tells me the prospect of stand up tubes had something to do withthis rebirth. We got our boards ready, lubed up with massive amounts of sunscreen, and made our way out to the Peak.


The Peak is located a short reef walk offshore, and the difficulty of the journey depends on the tide, and how much water is on the reef. Luckily, itwas high tide, so we didn't have to subject our tender feet to its sharpand urchin filled bottom. We made it out there in record time, and proceeded to trade off waves for the remainder of the day. Being the lone goofy footer of the trip, I was more than happy to split the peak with my comrades, making up for all the years growing up within the right hand point breaks of Santa Cruz. We all came in delirious with excitement, relating the details of our bestwaves, and the number of seconds we stayed in the tube. It was all time,and we had four days left! We slept well that night, our deep slumberfilled with dreams of aqua blue, stand up tubes.


The Peak at Lakey's is every surfer's dream. It's basically a playground. The right has a steep drop, in which heaving lips serve up aproper barrel section. After getting spit out of the tube, the waves bends right at you, with a wedgey ramp section at the end. The boy's were loving the chance to work on their front side tube riding skills, and it seemed that every time I looked, one of them was blasting ridiculously huge, rotated airs.


The left earned a special place in my heart. The first section is a somewhat mellow drop, which allows ample time to set your rail, stick your hand in the wave, and slow your pace for the oncoming slabbing second section. This second section draws heavily off shallow reef, and proceeds to keg out for a number of yards. After the barrel section, the wave continues its course, providing steep lips, perfect for blasting fins out turns and power carves. I was losing my mind at the chance to surf such perfect lefts, and after every session my legs were burning from the long rides.


The set up at our hotel was epic. Unlike the stressful bustle of Bali, Lakey's is a peaceful and quiet location. Every day after surfing, all wewould do is lounge by the pool, eat delicious food, and recharge our batteries for our next surf. It was great to be able to relax casually with no obligations, a blissful feeling that was relished by all. The locals were classic. Every day we had a host of eager dudes riding our coat tails, begging endlessly for stickers and offering us motor bike rides to nearby breaks. I reckon stickers are more valuable to them than gold! Once you gave out one, a swarm of his buddies would surround you, hands out stretched, psyching for the chance to get some of their own. At the end of our trip, TJ thought it would be funny to throw a stack in the air and see what kind of chaos ensued. The result was hilarious. Grown men,scratching and clawing at each other, rolling on the ground wrestling in the dirt, skinning their knees in order to get their share.


The local groms were ripping the peak as well, and they were amped to share their break with us, for which we're all extremely grateful. Although it started a little bumpy, the trip was a success. We scored insane barrels, made friends with kind locals, and ate delicious food. It felt as though we were in paradise, and we took advantage of our time there,surfing at least three times a day. When it came time to leave, we were all saddened, as Lakey's had served us so well during our stay. All good things must come to an end though, and we returned to Bali, invigorated with the excitement we had experienced, and delighted by the friends we made. It may have been a strenuous journey, but proved a small price to pay for such a memorable experience.